Random image of an industrial hook
Random image of an industrial hook
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Two patterns to benefit from React hooks in your React class components.

One of the great features of React is its component-based nature. Originally, function and class components coexisted and there were clear usages for both. Function components would be the most basic reusable components with no other logic than returning JSX. On the other hand, class components were intended to be more complex components encapsulating additional logic than just rendering JSX, for instance, managing state and running lifecycle methods.

However, after the addition of React hooks, this clear difference among them immediately disappeared. Hooks allow the use of state…


This chapter is part of The Honest Guide for Coding Bootcamps, a collection of thoughts after a full-time software engineer bootcamp.

Landing your first job isn’t the end of this process. Since day one as a software engineer, you must focus on continuing your career development and growth. These are my apprenticeship takeaways.


This chapter is part of The Honest Guide for Coding Bootcamps, a collection of thoughts after a full-time software engineer bootcamp.

Congrats! You finished your four-month training. Celebrate today, tomorrow you’ll be unemployed, and your job search will start. If you are considering taking a short break after the bootcamp, remember that you haven’t cemented most of the newly acquired knowledge. In my case, I took a week to recharge the batteries, but I didn’t consider a longer period to keep the momentum and rhythm.

Out of the entire career shift, the real transition happens at this moment. The training…


This chapter is part of The Honest Guide for Coding Bootcamps, a collection of thoughts after a full-time software engineer bootcamp.

Each bootcamp experience is different, but these are some of the outcomes I recommend to work towards since day one.


This chapter is part of The Honest Guide for Coding Bootcamps, a collection of thoughts after a full-time software engineer bootcamp.

You probably wouldn’t run a marathon without training for it. You probably don’t want to quit your job and become a broke student again. You were there once, but this time it can be different. These are some tips so that you get prepared for your career transition.


This chapter is part of The Honest Guide for Coding Bootcamps, a collection of thoughts after a full-time software engineer bootcamp.

Here you are, considering a career change. You’ve been working for years in accounting, music, not-for-profits, mechanical engineering, or teaching. Now you want to transition into the tech industry as a software engineer. Maybe you already work in tech but want to transition into engineering roles. In any case, you might be actively considering quitting your job, going back to studying and starting from scratch as an entry-level software engineer.

These decisions are never easy. You want to invest…


A collection of thoughts after a full-time software engineer bootcamp

Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

If you are reading this article, the chances that you’re considering applying to a software engineer bootcamp are pretty high. I was in your position a year ago. I quit my previous job at an environmental not-for-profit in NYC, went to Flatiron School, and got a six-figure software engineer job in a high-tech company in San Francisco.

This article could end here: another success story. However, I want to share a collection of thoughts, learnings, and humble advice for each phase throughout a bootcamp.


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The Honest Guide for Coding Bootcamps

Modals or modal boxes are very common application elements used in web design nowadays. Modals allow to show and draw the user’s attention to crucial information by overlaying a small element over the same website page they user is on. Modals improve the usability of sites and decrease unnecessary page reloads.

Modals can have many practical uses. Frequently they are used for displaying login and signup forms, contact and comment forms, and images and videos. However, there are many other use case examples for modals.

Mostly all modern front-end development…


This post is for those who have been coding web applications with React for a while and want to start learning React Native. You are 70% there! React Native works mostly like React but there are 3 things you need to know before you can start practicing and building your phone apps: how to create your React Native app with Expo, how to debug it using VSCode, and how to implement Redux in your app.

Go-to resources

The React Native team at Facebook put together great documentation to make it really easy to start right away using the framework. The Getting Started


Note: This is not a post about using Thunk in your Reach Redux app. If you want to learn more about Thunk, you can check the documentation or this post Why do we need middleware for async flow in Redux? where Dan Abramov gives reasons for using thunks and async middleware, and some useful patterns for using thunks.

Check my latest post!

The Honest Guide for Coding Bootcamps

Redux-Thunx is a fantastic middleware for asynchronous flow in Redux. There many resources online on how to use the fetch API for networking and how to integrate Thunk. …

Alberto Carreras

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